History of the theatre

Inauguration 1667

The Teatro Principal de Palma was inaugurated on August 27th, 1667 under the name of Casa de las Comedias (House of Comedies) with capacity for 800 people. A board of theologians had previously gathered to determine whether the performance of comedies was lawful.

At the end of the War of Succession, in 1715, the theatre was used as headquarters by the forces in favour of Philip V. . After undergoing various hardships, the building fell into decline.

In 1854 began the construction of the new theatre, called Teatro de la Princesa, with the extension of the plot on which it was situated. The interior was decorated by French scene painter Fèlix Cagé, who also decorated the Gran Teatre del Liceu de Barcelona. It was inaugurated on November 19th, 1857 in presence of Queen Elisabeth II and the Princess of Asturias.

Just a year later, on June 12th, 1858, after a performance of the Macbeth opera a fire destroyed the theatre completely.

Reconstruction. 1860

Once it was rebuilt by the same decorator and with the same plans, the theatre was re-inaugurated on September 14th, 1860, this time under the name of Teatro del Príncipe de Asturias. The performance chosen for the occasion was La campana de la Almudaina by Joan Palou i Coll and it counted once more with the presence of Elisabeth II.

Due to the Revolution of 1868, the name of the premises changed again to Teatro Principal.

Since then its structure has been refurbished and altered various times. The first modification took place in 1932 and it significantly changed the internal appearance of the theatre in order to increase its capacity.

Between 1975 and 1978, after a period of private management, it returned to public exploitation. During this period, the auditorium area was refurbished in order to increase its capacity. The dressing room area was also remodelled.

In 1980, it came to depend on the Consell de Mallorca.

In spring of 2007, the works that kept the premises closed for 6 years finished, and a modern building was inaugurated that, without losing its historic character, adapted to the needs of current performing arts.